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#AESmtg14 highlights: Frontal lobe epilepsy: semiology and cognitive aspects

Here is my live-tweeting from this Special Interest Group session from the 2014 Annual Meeting of the American Epilepsy Society on Dec. 7 in Seattle, WA, collected on Storify.

This session in fact turned into one long presentation by Prof. Patrick Chauvel, from the CHU of Marseille. And it was a truly masterful lesson, with many fascinating video-intracranial EEG presentations of patients with epilepsy involving the prefrontal lobe. Dr. Chauvel drew anatomical-electrical-clinical correlates from each patient to build a systematic approach to these poorly understood epilepsies.

#AESmtg14 highlights: What parts of the brain are active during seizures?

Here is my live-tweeting from this Investigators’ Workshop from the 2014 Annual Meeting of the American Epilepsy Society on Dec. 7 in Seattle, WA, collected in Storify.

Very interesting, thought-provoking session focusing in part on high-density micro-electrode array recordings of seizures in human patients (“Utah array”). The speakers were:

#AESmtg14 highlights: do focal seizure networks matter?

Here is my live-tweeting from this Investigators’ Workshop from the 2014 Annual Meeting of the American Epilepsy Society on Dec. 7 in Seattle, WA, collected in Storify.

This was a great session with many provocative ideas (starting with the title!), chaired by Dr. Jean Gotman from the Montreal Neurological Institute. The general discussion at the end of the presentations yielded several outstanding questions and exchanges between the panelists and the audience. The speakers were:

#AESmtg14 highlights: ictal semiology helps to localize the seizure onset zone

Here is my live-tweeting from this Special Interest Group session from the 2014 Annual Meeting of the American Epilepsy Society on Dec. 6 in Seattle, WA, collected in Storify.

These sessions, where very experimented clinicians and neurophysiologists discuss the relationships between the clinical features of seizures (semiology) and the brain areas involved in the seizure revealed by intracranial EEG, are extremely valuable to young clinicians and researchers interested in epilepsy and its neurophysiological underpinnings. The speakers for this session were:

#AESmtg14 highlights: dense array EEG and source localization in clinical practice

Here is my live-tweeting from this Special Interest Group session from the 2014 Annual Meeting of the American Epilepsy Society on Dec. 5 in Seattle, WA, collected in Storify.

EEG source imaging is a particular forte of the group where I did my PhD, Christoph Michel’s Functional Brain Mapping Laboratory, at the University of Geneva Medical Faculty and Geneva University Hospitals, and of Margitta Seeck’s Epilepsy and EEG unit at Geneva University Hospitals where I trained in clinical neurophysiology and epileptology. I had a hugely rewarding feeling when some of the work I contributed to was presented at the session (first time ever for me)!

The speakers at the session were:

#AESmtg14 highlights: Epilepsy as a spectrum disorder (or, another conference already?!)

I have been extremely lucky this year to be able to attend both the Society for Neuroscience’s (#SfN14) and the American Epilepsy Society’s (#AESmtg14) annual meetings in close succession. And as I did for the SFN, I will be live-tweeting and blogging about the AES meeting over the next few days.

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To get started, here is a Storify collection of my live-tweeting of the opening lecture, the Judith Hoyer lecture, given by Dr. Frances Jensen from the University of Pennsylvania. Dr. Jensen made the case for envisioning epilepsy as a spectrum disorder. In my opinion, it was the ideal way of opening the meeting, with insightful and thought-provoking ideas on how to broaden our vision of epilepsy research.

Stay tuned for more exciting research on epilepsy, its neural underpinnings, its consequences and its therapies from #AESmtg14!